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“Of course you're real-like any thought or any story. It's real when you're in it.”

lyeekha:

mikki-tsukiyomi:

Well. That was one of the quickest character developments I’ve seen…

Are you seriously telling me that all that villainous squinting and peering about is because he’s meant to be wearing glasses

because that’s amazing

(Source: angryblackman, via hallelujuapeno)

9 hours ago
340,343 notes
There are years that ask questions and years that answer.
Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (via observando)

(via fishingboatproceeds)

16 hours ago
15,958 notes
thatfunnyblog:

she died like 17 times

thatfunnyblog:

she died like 17 times

(Source: loboculiao)

1 day ago
118,421 notes

tobeheal-ed:

"My mental illness doesn’t make me strong or interesting. I do."

(Source: pleasestopbeingsad, via emotionaloutlet)

1 day ago
27,472 notes

discipleofkreia:

seekingmybeloved:

badreputations:

golden-gang:

videohall:

This girl is insane, I think

> It gets stranger and stranger as it goes.

> Her neighbors must hate her.

what are you talking about this was the best thing ever.

This is so wonderfully odd i have to reblog it everytime.

WHAT

THE

HECK

I love this girl.

(via patrickjbrumback)

1 day ago
369,145 notes

imperfectwriting:

norwegianblues:

THE most underrated scene in the entire movie. It was perfect. And do you know how often I see gif sets of it? This is the second one I’ve seen since the movie came out (It’s been over 5 months, now).

So let’s just pause for a moment from reblogging gifs of Tony’s sass, Loki’s sex appeal, or Bruce’s fluffiness and just appreciate this nameless, old, German guy and how, even though he knew he would probably die, he stood up to a tyrant to prove that the human race wouldn’t give up their freedom so easily.

Friendly reminder that it’s implied that he’s a Holocaust survivor.

(via hallelujuapeno)

1 day ago
376,544 notes
4gifs:

Whaling is the new planking. [vid]

4gifs:

Whaling is the new planking. [vid]

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via gifsee)

10 hours ago
16,333 notes

unconsumption:

An interesting, and somewhat confrontational, campaign to reduce consumption, featuring a shoe made of “shoreline rubbish.”

More at: EVERYTHING YOU BUY IS RUBBISH

16 hours ago
545 notes
sailorp00n:

theuppitynegras:

note-a-bear:

human-and-a-dancer:

it’s a puff ball with other puffballs for feetzies

NOOOOOOOOO

I’ve never been this damn happy in my entire life

IM SPUTTERING IDK WHAT TO DO WITH MYSELF OH MY GOSH

sailorp00n:

theuppitynegras:

note-a-bear:

human-and-a-dancer:

it’s a puff ball with other puffballs for feetzies

NOOOOOOOOO

I’ve never been this damn happy in my entire life

IM SPUTTERING IDK WHAT TO DO WITH MYSELF OH MY GOSH

(via nerdycommunity)

1 day ago
122,408 notes

fallontonight:

Our friend John Oliver is stopping by tonight!

(Source: catbushandludicrous)

1 day ago
38,393 notes
shananaomi:

The Denver Principles were written in 1983 by the People with AIDS caucus—11 gay men with AIDS from around the country—during the fifth annual Gay and Lesbian Health Conference, held that year in Denver..
As my friend Sean Strub recounts in his excellent memoir, Body Counts:




As the conference was wrapping up, the eleven manifesto co-authors stormed the plenary stage behind a banner that read “Fighting for Our Lives.” They took the microphone and read the manifesto to a stone-silent convention hall. According to media reports at the time, at the end of the presentation, “there wasn’t a dry eye in the house,” and the audience gave them a standing ovation that lasted nearly fifteen minutes. 
The concepts expressed in the Denver Principles manifesto weren’t new—to a large extent, they were an embodiment of feminist health principles—but it was radical for a group of people who shared a disease to organize politically to assert their right to a voice in the public-policy decision-making that would so profoundly affect their lives. Never in the history of humanity had this occurred; for people with AIDS, the Denver Principles document is the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Magna Carta all rolled into one. 
The Denver Principles defined the philosophical underpinnings of the self-empowerment movement for the AIDS epidemic and the network of service providers we created. It also quickly became a model for organizing by those with other chronic health conditions in the U.S. and around the world. 




I am truly excited to see The Normal Heart get all the publicity in the world, including Matt Bomer also appearing on the cover of Details this month. But some of the language used in their piece is offensive, outdated and insulting. At best, I’d guess it’s a badly executed attempt at clever wordplay, but it still reminded me that I really want to post some additional historical context for the early AIDS epidemic here, too. 
Image via ACT UP.

shananaomi:

The Denver Principles were written in 1983 by the People with AIDS caucus—11 gay men with AIDS from around the country—during the fifth annual Gay and Lesbian Health Conference, held that year in Denver..

As my friend Sean Strub recounts in his excellent memoir, Body Counts:

As the conference was wrapping up, the eleven manifesto co-authors stormed the plenary stage behind a banner that read “Fighting for Our Lives.” They took the microphone and read the manifesto to a stone-silent convention hall. According to media reports at the time, at the end of the presentation, “there wasn’t a dry eye in the house,” and the audience gave them a standing ovation that lasted nearly fifteen minutes.

The concepts expressed in the Denver Principles manifesto weren’t new—to a large extent, they were an embodiment of feminist health principles—but it was radical for a group of people who shared a disease to organize politically to assert their right to a voice in the public-policy decision-making that would so profoundly affect their lives. Never in the history of humanity had this occurred; for people with AIDS, the Denver Principles document is the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Magna Carta all rolled into one.

The Denver Principles defined the philosophical underpinnings of the self-empowerment movement for the AIDS epidemic and the network of service providers we created. It also quickly became a model for organizing by those with other chronic health conditions in the U.S. and around the world. 

I am truly excited to see The Normal Heart get all the publicity in the world, including Matt Bomer also appearing on the cover of Details this month. But some of the language used in their piece is offensive, outdated and insulting. At best, I’d guess it’s a badly executed attempt at clever wordplay, but it still reminded me that I really want to post some additional historical context for the early AIDS epidemic here, too. 

Image via ACT UP.

(via thispopculture)

1 day ago
109 notes